• Bindlestiff by Wayne Holloway
    Articles,  Books,  fiction,  Films/Movies/Cinema,  Literary,  Reviews

    Bindlestiff by Wayne Holloway (Review)

    A crumpled boot, a worn-down heel, a sole with a hole where the sun pours through when Frank holds it up for inspection. It is with this rather ordinary image that Wayne Holloway begins Bindlestiff. Frank proceeds to fix the hole with a knife, some rubber, and glue. The only piece of almost throwaway information that clues us in to this being anything but ordinary is the date. 2036. Frank is Marine Corp vet Frank Dubois, a forty-something black man journeying from Los Angeles to Detroit seeking redemption, and 2036 is a derailed, dystopian version of the future of the…

  • The Wedding Date by Jasmine Guillory
    Articles,  Books,  fiction,  General,  Literary,  Reviews

    The Wedding Date by Jasmine Guillory (Review)

    Alexa and Drew are two thirty-somethings who have a meet-cute when the Fairmont Hotel in San Francisco loses power, temporarily trapping them in the elevator. Alexa is head of staff for the mayor, while Drew is a pediatric surgeon from LA in town for the wedding of his ex-girlfriend and one of his best friends. Stranded without a date, he impulsively asks Alexa to be his plus-one. After the wedding, they keep up with weekend visits and it is soon turning into more. But Drew is staunchly committment-phobic. How will they work it out? I tried to go into this…

  • Lavinia by Ursula Le Guin
    Articles,  Books,  fiction,  General,  Literary,  Reviews

    Lavinia by Ursula Le Guin (Review)

    Lavinia is the only daughter of King Latinus and Queen Amata. The latter, made unstable by the grief of losing two sons, strongly wishes for her to marry her own sister’s boy, King Turnus. But the oracle has prophesised that Lavinia is to marry a foreigner (who ends up being Aeneas, the Trojan prince) soon making his way to their shores, and that their descendants would found a great empire. Thanks to Ursula Le Guin, Lavinia, barely mentioned in Vergil’s Aeneid, can finally tell her story.  “I am not the feminine voice you may have expected. Resentment is not what…

  • Articles,  Books,  fiction,  General,  Literary,  Reviews

    The Mermaid – Christina Henry (Review)

    [I received a copy of this from Berkley Books (Penguin Random House) in exchange for an honest review.] I read Lost Boy by Christina Henry two months ago and, honestly, it found me at the right time. I’d been disappointed by a few Peter Pan retellings as well as in need of some magic, however dark and broody. I also immediately put library holds on her Alice duology which I’m excited to get to soon. Then, later in the summer, I found out that she had a new book out. Initially, I was under the impression that it was a…

  • Articles,  Books,  fiction,  General,  Literary,  Reviews

    The Disappearance of Adele Bedeau (A review)

    I was given a review copy of this collection by Bee Books in exchange for an honest review. “You might as well say that whenever two people meet it’s strange. Our meeting is no stranger than any other meeting between two people who don’t know each other.” The quote describes The Disappearance of Adele Bedeau better than you would think at first glance. In the sleepy, provincial, transitory border town of Saint Louis, more people know each other by face than not, and yet, as the book shows us, it’s possible for people to harbour secrets, for murders to stay…

Website Developed By Visual Web Media