• Articles,  Books,  General,  Literary,  Reviews

    The Truth According to Us by Annie Barrows (Review)

    I decided to read this book because I loved The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society co-written by Annie Barrows, and I hoped that The Truth According to Us would give me at least half of the enjoyment of the former. Read on to find out whether that was the case. We have the twenty-something Layla Beck, the spoiled daughter of a US State Senator. We have twelve-year-old Willa Romeyn who lives in Virginia with her unmarried aunt Jottie, her younger sister, and their father Felix who travels a lot for work. It is the summer of 1939 and the…

  • Articles,  Books,  General,  Literary,  Reviews

    The Winter of the Witch by Katherine Arden (Review)

    “I have plucked snowdrops at Midwinter, died at my own choosing, and wept for a nightingale. Now I am beyond prophecy.” The last in a series are hard books to get right. More fail than not. So, I was certainly apprehensive about reading the last book of a trilogy I had loved until then. But, as it turned out, I shouldn’t have been. Katherine Arden nails it with The Winter of the Witch. In the book preceding this, Vasilisa “Vasya” Petrovna has accidentally caused the destruction of a large part of the city of Moscow by releasing the mythical firebird;…

  • Articles,  Football,  General

    Looking back: the Arsenal fan edition

    Football is nothing without the raw passion and emotion, the personal connections and collective stories of fans around the world. And just as any other sport, it is nothing without the pure, redemptive moments that make you believe, hope and dream, and matter as much, if not more, than the trophies. Right after my initiation into football at the 2002 World Cup, I was introduced to the world of club football in 2002/3. This was the time that football was slowly starting to gain a semblance of a foothold in India, a country that is still to a large extent…

  • Articles,  Books,  General,  Literary,  Reviews

    In pursuit of the shadow of the wind

    Originally published on Litro Online “It was the early summer of 1945, and we walked through the streets of a Barcelona trapped beneath ashen skies as dawn poured over Rambla de Santa Monica in a wreath of liquid copper.” (The Shadow of the Wind, Carlos Ruiz Zafon) Walk a bit further along Rambla de Santa Monica towards Calle Arco del Teatro and step through its arch. You will find yourself in a narrow alley. Even on a sunny summer’s day, these intricate, narrow streets that form so much of Barcelona’s old city are cooler, quieter, in shadow. On the day I…

  • Articles,  Books,  Films/Movies/Cinema,  General,  Reviews,  TV

    Texas Forever, Six: Why Friday Night Lights still means so much to me

    (This was originally published on Sabotage Times back in 2013, but I’ve since edited it. I’m overwhelmed by the continued number of comments on the piece by fellow fans from around the world. Goes to show the impact of this series and how time and place and culture doesn’t matter when it comes to something as universal as being human) Texas Forever, Six. It doesn’t mean much when Tim Riggins says it to Jason Street (best friend, star quarterback, jersey number 6) in the pilot when you barely know the characters. But the same thing uttered by Riggs (and brother…

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